3 Reasons to Use Twitter in Your Educational Marketing

twitterMost companies use Twitter the same way they use advertising – as a one-way communication blast. Although it is easy to set up and manage your Twitter account this way, it is limiting and off-putting to your target audience. They quickly see through your self-serving Tweets, and tune you out. Often, for good. If you think of your website as “information central” and your Twitter account as an “outpost,” gathering and sharing intelligence, then you’ve got the right idea.The three best ways to use Twitter in your marketing are:

 

  • Research
  • Building Awareness
  • Establishing Authority

You can think of research in this sense as keeping your ear to the ground. Educators are talking and sharing on Twitter. They share what’s happening in their classrooms and schools, what they think about education issues, and what they need help with. Twitter is a direct channel to the connected educator…the educator who is actively invested in learning how to be more effective by connecting with other educators across the country. Building a community of interest and awareness of your products is the goal on Twitter. It is not a direct sales channel. As you know, educators are particularly sensitive to marketing spiels. Once they determine you are more interested in selling your stuff than in helping them, they’re gone. They’ll pass right over you.

So, how do you build community and awareness without turning off educators?

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STEM Skills Scarcity in Today’s Marketplace

This article was originally published at MCH Data's blog.

There has been so much controversy about the Common Core over the last year that it’s helpful to remember that it was initially the business community that called for a set of benchmarked skills to ensure that high school graduates were ready for college and career. Businesses needed high caliber applicants to take jobs in the 21st century economy.

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Insights from ‘The Zen of Social Media Marketing’ Guru Shama Hyder Kabani-a Review

 

front cover of the zen of social media marketingRight at the outset in the book’s introduction, Kabani points out the primary difficulty marketers have with social media. Their challenge is that they’re trying to apply traditional marketing rules to what essentially is a platform outside their control.

Therein, lies the most important lesson for companies struggling to understand social media marketing. The balance of power has shifted to consumers. By the time you become aware of your prospect, your prospect has already acquired massive amounts of information about you. Through search, social media, and recommendations from friends and colleagues, the consumer researches you and your company before you get a chance to say the first word.

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TEDx Talk by netTrekker Founder Randy Wilhelm – Igniting the Hope of Knowing

Photo of Randy Wilhelm, netTrekker founderAt TEDx event at Xavier University in May, netTrekker (now Knovation) founder Randy Wilhelm described children's innate curiosity as "living in the question." Kids think they can do anything – even fly. Their imaginations are free to explore any idea that is interesting to them.

However, in public education Wilhelm muses, we have lost our way as "the currency of education is no longer in the question – education currency is in the answer." In fact, we have organized ourselves around a system where success is defined as the highest total of correct answers.

In his talk, Wilhelm explores the idea that we, as adults, are asking the wrong question of our children. Instead of asking, "how intelligent are you?," we should be asking, "how are you intelligent?"

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Grow Your Business with Online Professional Learning Communities

grow your businessK-12 educators receive encouragement from their school districts to seek out online professional development opportunities. There they can form professional learning communities (PLCs) or a professional learning network (PLN). While some districts provide direction and a platform, other districts encourage teachers, librarians and administrators to find and participate in a PLC of their own choosing.

Earlier this week I had the privilege of presenting a free webinar called “Growing Your Business with Online Communities,” for K-12 education publishers sponsored by edWeb.net, a professional social network for the education community, and MCH Strategic Data, an education data company.

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Fueling the National Conversation about Education Reform

collaboration in the classroomOne of the wonderful aspects of working in the education marketplace is that partnerships between public and private entities regularly form for the purpose of research. Often, the research is freely shared for the benefit of the entire education community and marketplace.

Such are the new study results on assessment from the Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA) a not-for-profit committed to child-centered education and Peter Grunwald and Associates, a public relations and research practice focused on children, families, technology and education.

The factor that sets this K-12 study apart from others is that it adds a new voice to the conversation – parents. Most studies about assessment focus on students and educators only. As the study points out, parents are the primary consumers of assessment information and foot the bill for the assessments through taxes.

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Go to Where Your Customers Are and Engage Them There

Annie Galvin Teich-K-12 Publisher-The Teich GroupOne of the most important elements of successful marketing is customer engagement. In order to build relationships, you have to talk to your customers.

Some years ago, I worked for a company that believed that businesses could be effectively managed from behind spreadsheets, and it was all about the numbers. Consequently, not much effort went into building relationships with customers other than responding to minor customer service issues.

Then and now, the idea that you can build a successful business without customer engagement is nonsense.

Sometimes, the easiest thing to do is go meet your customers at conferences and trade shows. That’s where I’m headed today –to the Texas Computer Education Association annual conference or TCEA for short.

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Why is Digital Learning Day Important for Educators, Policy Makers, K-12 Publishers and EdTech Companies?

Yesterday was the first-ever national Digital Learning Day organized by the Alliance for Excellent Education headed up by former WV governor, Bob Wise. 15,000 educators and 1.7 million students from 39 states participated in this remarkable event. In addition, an untold number of education advocates, enthusiasts, reformers, policy wonks, journalists, consultants and K-12 vendors also participated via web broadcast and social media.

Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski kicked off the national town hall meeting with an announcement that the Obama administration wants digital textbooks to be implemented in every U.S. public school within 5 years. Yes, 2017.

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3 Reasons K-12 Publishers Need to Accelerate Development of Mobile Content Delivery

It's well established that technology is disruptive. K-12 schools have certainly found this to be true. But the next wave of disruptive technology for schools has already begun.

Across the country schools and districts are struggling to develop and implement BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) policies.

Protecting school and student data is a concern.

Overcoming the objections of administrators and educators who have to give up some control of the learning process is another.

Parents are putting pressure on schools to allow their children to use mobile devices in school. In many cases the students have better technology than the schools including more and more tablets.

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Keith Krueger on Parents, Students, Schools and Mobile Technology

Keith Krueger of Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) speaks about the changing landscape for students and schools and their use of mobile technology. Although the conversation should be led by parents and schools, students should also be involved because they need to learn to filter and evaluate information for themselves.>

This has direct impact on the types of learning systems that K-12 publishers can develop and support. The schools' needs are very different than they were ten years ago. <

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