3 New Rules of Branding

Traditional branding focused on push-out messaging via advertising, marketing and sales. In the traditional model, the publisher or the manufacturer controlled the conversation around the brand.

No more.

Here are 3 new rules of branding:

It's relationships not transactions.

The power position has shifted to the customer.

It is now the customer who researches available options, gathers opinions from others online and determines the moment of purchase.

The impact of good or bad customer experiences reverberate across the web. Product and brand managers must create positive relationships with customers and prospects and move quickly to head off trouble when there is a misstep.

It's about engagement.

The value of your brand is the totality of your engagement with your community. Branding is not just the information around the product – benefits, specs, pricing, etc. Branding is now about the product (or brand) experience.

How does the product affect your customer?

What is their experience with the product and with your company?

How easy is it for your customer to find information about you without being hammered with requests for purchase?

What about implementation and aftercare?

Customers and prospects who engage with your brand share their experiences with others. Companies must participate in all brand conversations no matter where they take place.

It's a different ROI

Brand vitality and equity are more than campaigns and sales numbers. Of course these metrics are important.

But relationships and community require a different set of metrics – ones that take a longer view of the value of the relationship between producer and customer.

How are you managing your social communities?

What is your attraction strategy?

What content are you sharing that affects customers' lives now and moves them closer to purchase?

Modern brand management requires an expanded tool kit.

What changes have you made to your marketing strategy that reflects these new branding realities?

For more on this topic, read "Old Marketing" v "New Marketing" AND A New Conversation

 


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